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DR. LORI DANIELS

Director of the UBC Tree Ring Lab
Professor in the Department of Forest and Conservation Sciences

RESEARCH PROGRAM

My research program is made up of the four following themes:

  • Successional processes, natural disturbance, and ecosystem management of coastal temperate rainforests of B.C.
     

  • Historic fire-vegetation-climate interactions in montane forests of the Canadian Cordillera
     

  • Temporal dynamics and function of coarse woody debris in terrestrial and riparian forests
     

  • Mechanisms of change and influence of climate variation on altitudinal treelines

Connect with me below.

I strive to advance fundamental scientific knowledge on forest dynamics, which is imperative for conserving and managing contemporary forests and adapting to global environmental change.

 

My research characterizes how natural disturbances, humans, and climate interact to drive temperate forest dynamics and resilience.

It has produced three key contributions:

  1. My international collaborations demonstrate widespread tree mortality in North and South America, disentangling the relative impacts of drought, insects and pathogens.
     

  2. Many forests in the Canadian Cordillera are increasingly susceptible to wildfire due to complex interactions among fire suppression, land-use and climatic change.
     

  3. My novel forest reconstructions include tree-ring methods adapted to address Indigenous cultural uses and traditional management, largely overlooked by forest managers.
     

My enduring partnerships with local and national governments, environmental organizations, forest management companies, community forests, and First Nations have helped me translate these scientific advances to operational conservation, restoration and management policies and practices.

WE WANT TO DO IMPORTANT WORK THAT MAKES A DIFFERENCE.

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CURRENT COURSES

FRST 351 Interior Field School

Field study at an interior BC location concentrating on land use, management and silviculture. Fees will be assessed to meet expenses. Students with FRST 351 and FRST 350 can only count 2 credits toward their program requirements.

FRST 320 Abiotic Disturbances: Fire & Climate

Ecological effects of fire and climatic (wind, temperature, and snow) disturbances; fire danger rating, principles of fire management and prescribed fire use; windthrow risk modelling and management.

 

Awards